What Tachograph Offences Are in UK Law

Tachograph offences

Wondering what are tachograph offences in the UK for lorry drivers? Read on to find out!

Tachographs are compulsory recording equipment for drivers of lorries and other public service vehicles, heavy good vehicles, and vehicles with 12 or more people. Tachograph is a device that records data regarding the distance, driving time, and speed of the vehicle to ensure drivers follow the rules determined by the Vehicle & Operator Service Agency. Vehicles registered on or after 1st May 2006 should be fitted with a digital tachograph, but those registered before this date can have analogue or digital equipment.

Let’s explore tachograph regulations and offences for lorry drivers in the UK!

Rules for Driving Hours

Lorry drivers should only drive up to 8 hours a day and should take a mandatory 45-minute break after 4.5 hours. They can drive up to 10 hours twice each week. Within a fixed week, starting at 00:00 on Monday and ending at 24:00 on the following Sunday, the maximum driving limit is set at 56 hours. The maximum driver hours over a 2-week period should not exceed 90 hours.

Daily Rest Requirement for Heavy Vehicle Drivers

Drivers are required to rest for 11 or more hours during a 24-hour period. During this time, they cannot even work on a self-employment basis. You can only reduce the 11-hour rest rate to 9 hours three times every week, only if you will make up for it during the next week.

A lorry driver can also split the rest period, but then it should be 12 hours. The first rest period can be 3 hours, and the second can be 9 hours. You can take this rest period inside the vehicle as long as there is sufficient space to sleep. Tachograph regulations require that he vehicle should also not be moving while you’re resting.

Tachograph Offences Sanctioning

Here are some ways in which you will be sanctioned for committing tachograph offences:

Verbal Warning

A minor offence committed accidentally because of inexperience will be dealt with a verbal warning, clarifying the offence and reiterating the consequences of continued offences.

Rectification Notice

An offence rectification notice might be issued against you due to an offence. You must rectify the offence within 21 days. Failing to do so will lead to further action.

Prohibition Note

Breaking tachograph regulations can lead to prohibition, which will essentially prohibit you from driving the vehicle for a specified or unspecified period until you meet the specifications mentioned on the note.

Prosecution

Serious tachograph offences will lead to prosecution of the driver, operator, or against all parties involved.

Referral to the Traffic Commissioner

Drivers with a vocational licence or operators with an operator’s licence might be reported to the traffic commissioner in addition to or instead of the prosecution to determine whether some form of administrative action should be taken against their licences or not.

Tachograph Offences & Related Punishments

Maximum fines and penalties for tachograph offences in the UK include:

  • Fine of up to £2,500 for not following driving time or rest time rules
  • Fine of up to £2,500 for not keeping records under the GB domestic regulations
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for not installing a tachograph
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for failing to use a tachograph
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for failing to hand over records related to recording equipment when requested by an enforcement officer
  • Altering the record of a tachograph can result in a fine of £5,000 and two years’ imprisonment
  • Forging or altering the seal on a tachograph with the intention of deception can result in a fine of £5,000 and two years’ imprisonment

If you have committed tachograph offences, reach out to a qualified attorney to request the tachograph data from the prosecutor and liaise with them. A lawyer can also defend you in your trial and save you from severe punishment.

Foreign Judgement Enforcement for Debt Recovery Post-Brexit

foreign judgement enforcement in the UK

Wondering whether foreign judgement enforcement is possible in the UK after Brexit or not? The truth is that a foreign judgement can be enforced in the country based on when it was given, what jurisdiction provisions the involved parties agreed upon, which court gave the judgement, and many other factors. Let’s explore five possible ways for foreign judgement enforcement in the UK!

Hague Convention

The Hague Convention only applies to agreements that provide exclusive jurisdiction to the participating state’s courts. Any judgement chosen by courts in this way is enforceable in all participating states. A state can only refuse a judgement if it’s obtained by fraud or incompatible with an earlier English judgement.

The Hague Convention was brought into effect in English law through the Private International Law Act 2020. The parties of this convention include the UK, the EU, and Singapore. So, a judgement given in one of these states is enforceable in the country if the judgement comes after the convention was brought into effect in the state that passed it.

Administration of Justice Act 1920

This act enables the registration and enforcement of money-related judgements given in specific foreign states that were part of the British Empire, such as Cyprus, Nigeria, the Cayman Islands, Zimbabwe, New Zealand, and Malta. Even though registration for the judgement is not mandatory, it might be ordered in the absence of a good reason.

The court provides 12 months after the foreign judgement to apply for registration, but it can extend this time. It can only be refused when the judgement is obtained through fraud or contradicts public policy, and the judgement debtor was not in the relevant state for business or a resident of the state. It can’t be made if there’s a pending appeal.

The jurisdiction requires that an individual facing court proceedings in a country where they are not usually present and have not agreed to it must determine whether to partake in the proceedings or not. If they do, they will submit to the court’s jurisdiction and will retain their ability to challenge English enforcements on jurisdictional grounds. If they don’t, the judgement will be entered against them.

Foreign Judgments (Reciprocal Enforcement) Act 1933

Foreign Judgements Act applies to conclusive money judgements. It is used in mutual enforcement treaties between the UK and other states and has similar jurisdictional requirements as the Administration of Justice Act 1920. However, the registration of foreign judgement is not subject to discretion in this act. It applies to countries like Pakistan, Norway, Australia, Canada, and Israel.

Foreign Judgments (Reciprocal Enforcement) Act 1933: Special Cases

This act also applies to six members of the EU, Belgium, Austria, Italy, Germany, France, and the Netherlands, because of treaties between these members and the UK between 1930s-1960s. This act and the treaties were superseded by the Brussels Convention and EU regulations.

It brings up the question of their revival post-Brexit. The matter is not clear from the EU end. However, section 6 of the 1933 act states that if the judgement registration under the act is possible, it’s the only way available in the UK to recover the debt from the judgment.

The Common Law

The common law process of foreign judgement enforcement in the UK is only available when there is no other way to enforce a judgement. It is used for judgements from the US, Russia, China, and Spain. Under the common law, the English court will treat a foreign judgement as creating a debt due from the judgement debtor to the judgement creditor if the judgement meets specific conditions. Then, the court will give an English judgement on the debt.

Typically, if the foreign judgement meets the English court criteria, which is similar for the judgements applied under the aforementioned acts, it’s possible to attain a summary English judgement.

EU Legacy Judgments

When the UK was an EU member, judgements given by the court in the member states were enforced in the English courts under the Brussels I Regulation, resulting in an almost automatic process. The 2007 Lugano Convention between the EU and the Swiss, Icelandic, and Norwegian courts resulted in similar provisions.

However, since Brexit, the Lugano Convention and the Brussels I Regulation have ceased to be applicable in the UK. Yet, the Brussels Regulation still applies to the enforcement of judgements that started before Brexit. The UK has used the same approach for the countries that followed Lugano Convention.

Foreign Judgement Enforcement in the UK

Once you register a foreign judgement in the UK, it is enforced just like a domestic judgement. In fact, even before foreign judgement enforcement in the UK, you can obtain interim measures, such as a freezing injunction, to support the attempted enforcement.

The English courts will recognize a foreign judgement in certain cases, such as if there’s no contract or a breach of contract between the parties. In such instances, it will not be possible to re-litigate the decision on UK soil.

UK Visa Refusal Appeal to Immigration Tribunal

UK visa refusal appeal

If you’re facing UK visa refusal from the Home Office or UKVI, you can challenge the application rejection with your right of administrative review or appeal to the immigration tribunal. Even though visa application rejection might feel like the end of the world, it really isn’t since more than half of Home Office immigration decisions get turned over due to appealing to the immigration tribunal.

Here’s everything you need to know about appealing for UK visa refusal:

Your Right to Appeal

The legal course of action you can take to appeal your visa rejection will depend on the type of application you submit. For instance, all PBS or points-based system applications and those applications for PBS migrant family members, i.e., Tier 1, 2, 4, and 5, have the right of administrative review.

Applications under EEA regulations and Human Rights and Protection claims have the full right to appeal to the immigration tribunal. However, some in-country rights can be deemed certified, which means the applicant can only lodge the appeal once they leave the country. Lastly, visitor visa applications or temporary student visa applications come with no rights of appeal except for a few limited cases.

UK Visa Refusal Process

Those applicants whose visas got rejected but have the full right to appeal can appeal to the immigration tribunal. These cases might include a spousal visa refusal, ILR application refusal, Residence Card refusal, or Permanent Residence refusal. You will typically get 14 calendar days to lodge an appeal for an application refused inside the country, such as an extension or ILR. Applicants outside the UK will have 28 days to appeal the refusal.

When an application is refused, the applicant receives reasons for the refusal letter from the UKVI or Home Office. It outlines why the application was rejected and includes guidance on the right to appeal and the timeframe for appealing.

If you receive a rejection, your first option is to appeal the refusal after assessing the refusal and how you can challenge it. Alternatively, if the reasons for refusal can be addressed, you can reapply as it will be quicker than appealing. Thirdly, you can overturn the refusal before lodging the appeal by requesting the UKVI to reconsider. It only applies in cases the UKVI makes an obvious error.

How to Appeal Visa Rejection in the UK

If you have decided on submitting a UK visa refusal appeal, you must prepare comprehensively by assessing the documents, evidence, reasons for refusals, and more. You must also work with an attorney to draft grounds of appeal to the First-Tier Tribunal, prepare witness statements, complete the appeal form, and compile an appeal bundle. Then, you will need to lodge the appeal with the Immigration Tribunal and then serve the grounds and supporting document to the Home Office.

When it comes to entry clearance appeals, the case will be handled and reviewed by an Entry Clearance Manager (ECM). A well-prepared appeal will often lead to the visa refusal decision being overturned at the ECM stage. For in-country applications, a dedicated Home Office team will reconsider pending appeals.

Since appealing to the immigration tribunal can be overwhelming, it’s best to hire qualified attorneys to do that on your behalf and to prepare your case meticulously to give you the best chance at acquiring your visa.

Who Are Deportation Lawyers, and How Can They Help You?

Deportation lawyers

If you are not a British citizen and the court sentences you to more than 12 months of imprisonment or you find yourself committing a deportation-worthy crime, the UK government will make the efforts to deport you.

However, you will have the right to work with deportation lawyers to appeal such a decision, present any arguments you might have against your deportation, and more. Deportation appeal arguments are rooted in the person’s ties to the UK and will usually be based on their family, long time of residence, etc.

Let’s explore who deportation lawyers are and how they can help you!

Who Are Deportation Lawyers?

Deportation lawyers are qualified attorneys who have experience in deportation appeal cases and related cases. They can help you appeal your deportation and help you stay in the UK by presenting suitable arguments rooted in proof.

Deportation immigration attorneys can help you present all your arguments to the Home Office before the UK government makes the decision to deport you. Moreover, your lawyer will also present your arguments to the tribunal, where your appeal against deportation will be heard.

How Can a Deportation Lawyer Help You?

A deportation lawyer will give you initial advice on where you stand and guide you on the related law and process involved in your case. They will also take detailed statements from you, your loved ones, and witnesses that might add value to your case.

Your deportation attorney will obtain any evidence and files from the court or your previous attorney. They will identify and gain evidence of points of mitigation for offending behaviour and collect evidence related to rehabilitation.

Your deportation lawyer will attend your preliminary hearings, prepare bundles for court, prepare your legal argument, and represent your case at court. They will also give you pertinent advice on the judge’s decision and guide you on whether you should appeal again if the initial result is not favourable.

Do You Need a Deportation Appeal Lawyer?

The real question is, do you need a deportation appeal lawyer, or can you do without one? Can you appeal your deportation without the expertise of an immigration attorney? While it’s certainly not impossible to prepare your appeal and go through the process without the help of a deportation lawyer, it’s undoubtedly more useful to have that qualified assistance.

Deportation lawyers are aware of the nuances of deportation cases, and they can help you identify key problems in your case and give you qualified advice, assistance, and evidence in relation to those problems.

With a seasoned deportation appeal lawyer in your corner, you will stand a better chance of your appeal resulting in success. So, even if you are unsure whether you should hire a lawyer or not, always speak to one and ask for a one-off consultation in which they can assess the merits of your case, highlight the issues, offer ideas on appeal presentation, and more.

What Tachograph Offences Are in UK Law

Tachograph offences

Wondering what are tachograph offences in the UK for lorry drivers? Read on to find out!

Tachographs are compulsory recording equipment for drivers of lorries and other public service vehicles, heavy good vehicles, and vehicles with 12 or more people. Tachograph is a device that records data regarding the distance, driving time, and speed of the vehicle to ensure drivers follow the rules determined by the Vehicle & Operator Service Agency. Vehicles registered after 1st May 2006 should be fitted with a digital tachograph, but those registered before this date can have analogue or digital equipment.

Let’s explore tachograph regulations and offences for lorry drivers in the UK!

Rules for Driving Hours

Lorry drivers should only drive up to 8 hours a day and should take a mandatory 45-minute break after 4.5 hours. They can drive up to 10 hours twice each week. Within a fixed week, starting at 00:00 on Monday and ending at 24:00 on the following Sunday, the maximum driving limit is set at 56 hours. The maximum driver hours over a 2-week period should not exceed 90 hours.

Daily Rest Requirement for Heavy Vehicle Drivers

Drivers are required to rest for 11 or more hours during a 24-hour period. During this time, they cannot even work on a self-employment basis. You can only reduce the 11-hour rest rate to 9 hours three times every week, only if you will make up for it during the next week.

A lorry driver can also split the rest period, but then it should be 12 hours. The first rest period can be 3 hours, and the second can be 9 hours. You can take this rest period inside the vehicle as long as there is sufficient space to sleep. Tachograph regulations require that he vehicle should also not be moving while you’re resting.

Tachograph Offences Sanctioning

Here are some ways in which you will be sanctioned for committing tachograph offences:

Verbal Warning

A minor offence committed accidentally because of inexperience will be dealt with a verbal warning, clarifying the offence and reiterating the consequences of continued offences.

Rectification Notice

An offence rectification notice might be issued against you due to an offence. You must rectify the offence within 21 days. Failing to do so will lead to further action.

Prohibition Note

Breaking tachograph regulations can lead to prohibition, which will essentially prohibit you from driving the vehicle for a specified or unspecified period until you meet the specifications mentioned on the note.

Prosecution

Serious tachograph offences will lead to prosecution of the driver, operator, or against all parties involved.

Referral to the Traffic Commissioner

Drivers with a vocational licence or operators with an operator’s licence might be reported to the traffic commissioner in addition to or instead of the prosecution to determine whether some form of administrative action should be taken against their licences or not.

Tachograph Offences & Related Punishments

Maximum fines and penalties for tachograph offences in the UK include:

  • Fine of up to £2,500 for not following driving time or rest time rules
  • Fine of up to £2,500 for not keeping records under the GB domestic regulations
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for not installing a tachograph
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for failing to use a tachograph
  • Fine of up to £5,000 for failing to hand over records related to recording equipment when requested by an enforcement officer
  • Altering the record of a tachograph can result in a fine of £5,000 and two years’ imprisonment
  • Forging or altering the seal on a tachograph with the intention of deception can result in a fine of £5,000 and two years’ imprisonment

If you have committed tachograph offences, reach out to a qualified attorney to request the tachograph data from the prosecutor and liaise with them. A lawyer can also defend you in your trial and save you from severe punishment.

Who Are Motoring Offences Solicitors, and How Can They Help You?

Motoring offences solicitors

If you find yourself stuck in legal trouble after committing a driving offence and are worried that your driving licence will be revoked, you can reach out to solicitors who specialize in road offences. These individuals are known as motoring offences solicitors. They can effectively defend you in your road traffic offence case.

Who Are Motoring Offences Solicitors?

As mentioned, motoring offences lawyers or solicitors are qualified attorneys who have experience in defending drivers and have successfully helped countless individuals retain their driving licenses. These lawyers are well aware of all the different types of driving offences, and know how to get you out of trouble so that you don’t have to lose your licence in the UK. Moreover, a highly qualified motoring offences solicitor will be able to help you avoid maximum penalties for your driving offence.

A seasoned driving offences solicitor will sit you down and ask pertinent questions to ensure they have everything they need to know to present your case in the court of law. They will also discuss whether they need medical reports or other expert witness testimonies or evidence to present your defence or create a mitigation package. This way, your motoring offences lawyer will ensure that all your bases are covered.

How Can Motoring Offences Solicitors Help You

Motoring offences solicitors can provide you with a vast array of services and help you fight the following charges:

  • Speeding
  • Reckless driving or driving without due care or diligence
  • Drunk driving offences including “drunk in charge”
  • Driving without licence or insurance
  • Causing death by dangerous or reckless driving
  • Driving whilst disqualified
  • Tachometer offences
  • Loss of licence due to medical condition or old age
  • Driving whilst using a foreign licence
  • Totting up
  • Excess speed on a motorway
  • Construction and use
  • Tacograph, HVG, overloading offences & so much more!

A highly qualified team of motoring offences solicitors can help you with all aspects of different offences. The key is to find a reliable team of motoring offences lawyers at the earliest, so they have the time to study your case and provide you with the best possible service.

Find Qualified Motoring Offences Solicitors

If you are at the receiving end of a driving offence fine or are worried that your offence will lead you to serve time or lose your licence, make sure to find a qualified motoring offence solicitor to take up your case. The best approach to finding someone reliable is to ensure they offer a consultation, live meetings, and have exceptional qualifications, knowledge of road laws and driving offences, years of qualified experience in dealing with cases related to motoring offences, and the testimonials that prove their services are reliable.

Instead of approaching someone who will only correspond with you via email, try to find a dependable motoring offences solicitor who will give you and your case the time and attention it deserves, present irrefutable evidence in your favour, and help you get out of your dilemma. Lastly, you should also find someone who will do all that at a reasonable price while presenting a specialised defence for your motoring offence.

What You Should Know About Child Arrangements Orders in UK Law

A child arrangements order is a legally binding court order to ensure the welfare of a child with divorcing or separated parents who cannot agree on child arrangements. It is an order that deems whom the child will live with and how they will meet and interact with each parent.

Let’s learn all there is to know about a child arrangements order in the UK!

What Does a Child Arrangements Order Achieve?

A child arrangements order legally defines which part the child will live with and whom they will spend their time with. It defines who will have the responsibility to care for the child and when. This order essentially replaces the older residence and contact orders in child arrangements in the UK. However, parents with these older orders will not have to re-apply for a child arrangements order.

A child arrangements order will essentially define how often and when the child will see either parent. For instance, it might state the child will live with both parents on a shared basis or spend a few weekends with one parent and live for the remainder of the days with others. It might cover arrangements for holidays and include the frequency of phone calls, letters, cards, etc.

Who Can Apply for This Order?

Parents of the child have an automatic right to apply for a child arrangements order in the UK. Step-parents, including those who are in a civil partnership, can also apply for this order. Moreover, a local authority foster parent, a close relative (sister, brother, uncle, aunt, or grandparent) with whom the child has lived for over one year, and any individual with whom the child has lived for at least 3 years can also apply for a child arrangements order.

Additionally, people who don’t have parental responsibility for the child can take the court’s leave to apply for this order. The court will consider the applicant’s relationship with the child and if their application will disrupt the child’s life to the point of harm to determine whether it should grant the leave or not.

 When Should You Apply for This Order?

If you cannot reach an agreement with the other parent on the care of your child, you should apply for this order. However, before the application, try to reach an agreement through mediation. The court might also require you to attend a Mediation Information Assessment Meeting to establish if you might be able to agree on the terms with the other parent through mediation.

When Does a Child Arrangements Order Cease to Be Legally Binding?

This order is legally binding till the child turns 16 or 18 under exceptional circumstances. Moreover, if either parent breaches the order or any of its terms, they will be held in contempt of court and face fines, community service, or even prison.

Can You Change the Order?

You can apply to the court to alter the order if it no longer suits your child’s best interests. Make sure the application is to alter the order instead of breaching it, as that can lead you to be held in contempt of court, leading to serious consequences.

When applying for a child arrangements order in the UK, it’s best to seek the help of a qualified child custody attorney. They can also guide you toward mediation before the application process to ensure there’s no animosity between you and the child’s other parent, which will ultimately benefit your child.

How Much Time Does It Take to Get Divorced in the UK?

How long does it take to get divorced in the UK?

Wondering how long does it take to get divorced in the UK? A divorce process will take at least six months in the country. It’s because there are two waiting periods in a typical UK divorce. There’s a 20-week frame between the divorce application and the conditional order. Then, you have to wait for six weeks for the conditional order to be granted and apply for the final order. Moreover, the length of your divorce will also be determined based on your financial affairs and other factors.

Here are all the steps involved in a divorce process that determines how long it takes to get divorced in the UK:

Applying for a Divorce

Firstly, you need to send your divorce application to the court. On the petition, you will need to write your and your partner’s full name and address and provide proof of your marriage certificate. You can apply separately or with your partner as a joint applicant. If you apply separately, your partner will be the respondent. The application will cost you £593; you can share that cost when making a joint application. Apply online for a quicker process.

The Acknowledgement of Service

If you apply for divorce independently, your partner will receive an acknowledgment of service that they must return within 14 days. If you apply jointly, you will both receive a copy of the divorce application and an acknowledgement receipt that you don’t need to respond to. The joint process will be quicker.

The Cooling Off Period

Next, your divorce application will enter a 20-week cooling-off period in which you can reflect on your decision and discuss pertinent matters, such as division of finances and child arrangements.

Application for a Conditional Order

If your divorce process began before 6 April 2022, you would be subjected to the old divorce laws of decree nisi and decree absolute. However, if your process began after that, you will need to apply for a conditional order, a document that states the court sees no reason to object to your divorce.

You can apply for this order online or via post 20 weeks after your divorce application. You and your partner will receive a Certificate of Entitlement, which will detail when you will receive your conditional order. The order can take many weeks to arrive.

The Final Order Application

You can apply for the final order after six weeks and one day of getting the conditional order. The final order will lawfully end your marriage, enabling you to marry again. But it will not end your financial commitments to your ex. You will have to draft a financial order for that.

Sorting Out Finances & Child Arrangements

Sorting out marital assets and child arrangements should ideally be done before the final order. You can agree with your spouse on how to split the finances and make the agreement legally binding through a financial order. It might take six months to a year. Similarly, if you have children, you will need to determine whom they will live with and who will bear their expenses.

Talk to a Divorce Lawyer

Now that you know how long it takes to get divorced in the UK, you should seek the expertise of a divorce attorney and mediator to ensure your divorce and related financial settlement and child custody matters wrap up quickly and in your favour. Ideally, with quick mediation, your divorce settlement will be quicker and smoother. A qualified divorce lawyer can guide you on the best way forward, depending on your circumstances.

Immigration Law – Deportation from the UK

Deportation from the UK

One may face deportation from the UK if they are deemed a criminal and are believed to be a threat to the public. In some instances, you may be able to contest your deportation, but in most cases, you do not have an automatic right of appeal. You may be able to contest the ruling if you make a human rights claim, for instance.

Thus, this article discusses this aspect of immigration law in the UK in detail so that you know what options you may have if you ever find yourself being deported. In addition to that, it explains the difference between removal and deportation from the UK. Also, please note that all of the details below are specific to England.

Deportation from the UK

It’s important to understand that there’s a significant difference between deportation and removal from the UK. Deportation almost always pertains to foreign nationals who are convicted of criminal offences and have a prison sentence of more than 12 months. Therefore, deportation may be requested under the following grounds.

  • When the Secretary of State believes that deporting an individual is for the “public good” and “public interest”
  • Someone is the civil partner, spouse, or child below 18 years of the individual being deported
  • When the court suggests deportation for an individual over 17 years who has been convicted of a crime that is punishable by imprisonment

Removal from the UK

Administrative removal from the UK is a different case, however. It is for those individuals who have to be removed because their visa granting them stay in the UK expired. Like deportation, there are also grounds for administrative removal, as listed below.

  • People who do not have the right to stay in the UK, such as illegal entrants, overstayers, etc.
  • The family members of the individual being removed
  • Any individual breaching the conditions of their visa to stay in the UK
  • People who use deceiving information to seek or acquire leave

Contesting Deportation from the UK

As mentioned above, only some unique cases may be able to contest deportation from the UK. Therefore, a human rights claim about Article 3 or Article 8 of the Human Rights Act 1998 of the UK. If you can contest your deportation, then you must make your appeal within 28 days of the ruling. However, an individual in detention has 5 days to make the appeal.

Last Few Words

You will need a highly experienced solicitor who understands the nuances of this type of law if you plan to contest your deportation from the UK. It’s highly unlikely to reach a favourable outcome unless there are some things incorrect about your case. Thus, if you are confident that you are wrongly being deported, then make sure that you have a solicitor who can overturn that ruling for you or whoever is dealing with this issue.

Drink Driving in the UK

Drink driving in the UK

Throughout the UK, the laws regarding drink driving are strict, with penalties that can cost you money, driving disqualification, and prison time (in some cases). Therefore, this article on drink driving in the UK highlights the different ways the police can determine if you are drunk enough to be breaking the law.

Drink Driving in the UK

There are three ways the authorities may check if you are intoxicated by alcohol. These include a breath, blood, and urine test.

The Drink Driving Limits in England, Northern Ireland, and Wales

The driving limit is different in different parts of the UK. Here’s what it is in England, Northern Ireland, and Wales.

The breath test is the preliminary test, and the authorities typically perform it on the roadside if they suspect someone is guilty of drink driving. Therefore, the drink driving limit for the breath test is 35 micrograms of alcohol for every 100 millilitres of breath.

If you fail the test, you will be placed under arrest and taken to the police station. There, the police will require additional evidence of drink driving by performing another breath test or alternatively blood and/or urine tests.

For the blood test, a suspect will be guilty of drink driving if every 100 millilitres of their blood contain 81 milligrams of alcohol. On the other hand, for the urine test, a suspect will be guilty of drink driving if every 100 millilitres of their urine contain 108 milligrams of alcohol.

The Drink Driving Limits in Scotland

The limits for drink driving in the UK have been stricter in Scotland since 2014.

  • For the breath test, a suspect may be guilty of drink driving if 100 millilitres of their breath contain 22 micrograms of alcohol.
  • For the blood test, a suspect may be guilty of drink driving if 100 millilitres of their blood contain 50 milligrams of alcohol
  • For the blood test, a suspect may be guilty of drink driving if 100 millilitres of their urine contain 67 milligrams of alcohol

Why You Should Not Drink Drive

In addition to breaking the law, here are some additional reasons why you should not drink and drive. Thus, when you are intoxicated:

  • Your brain takes longer to acquire and process the information from your eyes, impairing your vision
  • Your reaction times are slower than normal because it takes your brain longer to send messages to the muscles in your body
  • You may struggle to control the vehicle because your brain finds it challenging to process basic information

Therefore, the bodily impairments can put you and others on the road at significant risk, as you may not read traffic cues or react quickly to unexpected situations.

Last Few Words

If you don’t ever want to be charged with drink driving in the UK, then it’s best to look for other means of transport before you plan to drink. Keep your phone charged, and save any reliable app to make it easy to call for a car when you need one.